DAR members honor one of their own

Hannah Covington McGree grave marked with DAR insignia

By Kevin Spradlin
PeeDeePost.com

ROCKINGHAM — Members of four area chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution gathered Monday afternoon in Rockingham to honor Hannah Covington McGee, the late wife of Dr. Jerry McGee.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com Dr. Jerry McGee, right, talks with Nancy Sherrill Robbins by the gravesite of his late wife, Hannah Covington McGee.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com
Dr. Jerry McGee, right, talks with Nancy Sherrill Robbins by the gravesite of his late wife, Hannah Covington McGee.

McGee and members of the Gen. Henry William Harrington and John Foster chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution met at the Alfred Dockery Cemetery at 992 Cartledge Creek Road and placed the DAR insignia on Hannah McGee’s grave marker.

Member Susanne McInnis, who made Revolutionary War Punch and other themed snacks for those in attendance, said marking the grave added awareness of the DAR to visitors and showed a link between today, family history and the birth of the United States.

Frances Covington Thomas welcomed attendees while Mary Bowles, regent of the Gen. Henry William Harrington chapter, described the purpose of the group. Chapter Chaplain Nancy Sherrill Robbins read scripture and offered prayer while Judy Gibson, of the Pinehurst chapter, performed “Amazing Grace.”

Virginia Smith Kendrick Bjorlin, regent of the Monroe chapter, offered the personal tribute to Hannah Covington McGee before presenting her gravestone with the DAR insignia.

Thomas said the Dockery family plantation on Cartledge Creek Road goes back to 1769, when Thomas Dockery relocated from Maryland. Dockery began a religious school inside his home, built in 1832, that later became Cartledge Creek Baptist Church. The first conversations that later gave birth to Wake Forest University were started here, Thomas said.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com

“That started here, in this community and in our hearts,” Thomas said. “It’s very much a part of our history.”

Eight generations of the Dockery family have lived at the plantation, Thomas said. Two weeks ago, the ninth generation was began when the youngest family member was born.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com Susanne McInnis, left, and Mary Bowles, second from left, enjoy Revolutionary War Punch McInnis prepared for the group.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com
Susanne McInnis, left, and Mary Bowles, second from left, enjoy Revolutionary War Punch McInnis prepared for the group.

 

Filed in: Featured News, Latest Headlines, Military and Veterans, News, Rockingham

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