‘A little doggy social time’

2nd annual Mutt Strutt raises more than $3,300

By Kevin Spradlin
PeeDeePost.com

ROCKINGHAM — Otis barked to get somebody’s — anybody’s — attention.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com Lola, right, was found pregnant with what turned out to be 12 pups inside her. After multiple attempts at a permanent home, she finally found one through Richmond County Animal Advocates.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com
Lola, right, was found pregnant with what turned out to be 12 pups inside her. After multiple attempts at a permanent home, she finally found one through Richmond County Animal Advocates.

Gracie worked on her high-fives with her human companion while Junior, an English bulldog, was content in letting people come to him as he sat silently in his corner in the shade of the pavilion.

Dogs in Richmond County had their day Sunday — or at least a few hours — during the Mutt Strutt, a second-year effort coordinated by Allison Sweatt and Richmond County Animal Advocates. Food sales and raffles helped raise some money for the organization, which will celebration its second birthday in September and maintains nonprofit status under the umbrella of Last Chance Animal Rescue, a New York- based animal advocacy and rescue group.

There was no measured distance to run or walk, for humans or canines. Other than a bouncy house for children, there was no mandated activity for anyone.

It was, Sweatt said, “a little doggy social time.”

The idea, she said, was to allow dog owners to network, to “come to Hinson Lake with your dog and show your dog off.”

Sweatt said one of the goals of the fledgling RCAA was to have people become accustomed to certain months being defined by RCAA-related events, such as the Mutt Strutt in May, the dog wash in July and the Allison Butler 5K and doggy dash, also at Hinson Lake, in November, along with other fundraisers.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com Junior, an English bulldog who's happy to stay in one put and let visitors come to him.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com
Junior, an English bulldog who’s happy to stay in one put and let visitors come to him.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com This dog is clearly ready to run.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com
This dog is clearly ready to run.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com Otis, left, greeted many fellow dogs, large and small, with something less than a ferocious-sounding bark.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com
Otis, left, greeted many fellow dogs, large and small, with something less than a ferocious-sounding bark.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com Gracie, right, is in training to become a therapeutic dog in order to visit children in schools, seniors and others who might benefit from a temporary canine companion.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com
Gracie, right, is in training to become a therapeutic dog in order to visit children in schools, seniors and others who might benefit from a temporary canine companion.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com Baby, a 1-year-old bloodhound, is anything but your typical infant.

Kevin Spradlin | PeeDeePost.com
Baby, a 1-year-old bloodhound, is anything but your typical infant.

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  • Rebecca Davis

    It was a great event!

  • Scottie Moh

    I agree….I loved seeing everyone’s dog, Big Little, tall, short, fat and thin!!! I learned of some new breeds too.

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